Latest Reviews

History

Queensland Reviewers Collective (QRC) is the new name for an initiative that began eighteen years ago. Up until November 2016 it was known as M/C Reviews. In December 2015, the M/C Reviews website had a major security breach that took it down, and the editor of the book reviews section and some of the reviewers responded by starting a blog as a temporary site for book reviews until the website could be repaired. Unfortunately, it eventually became apparent that the website was not able to be restored, thus ending its long and illustrious presence as a place for the lively engagement with books and film through reviewing.

Once again, the editor and a small group of book reviewers decided they valued M/C Reviews enough to enable its rebirth as the Queensland Reviewers Collective. It no longer has an association with the Queensland University of Technology.

The website that M/C Reviews was initially a part of was M/C – Media and Culture, founded in 1998 as, according to the History section, ‘a place of public intellectualism, analysing and critiquing the meeting of media and culture’. It was meant as a place where the popular and the academic could meet, and ‘debates may have some resonance with wider political and cultural interests’.

The website was initiated and developed at the University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; since 2004, it has been hosted by the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology in Kelvin Grove. The first publication was the M/C Journal, still thriving today, followed by M/C Reviews, and then M/Cyclopedia of New Media.

Acknowledgement of Country

In the spirit of reconciliation Queensland Reviewers Collective acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.

Other Reviews

General Fiction

Everything is Beautiful by Eleanor Ray

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve Amy, the leading character in this book, is a compulsive hoarder.  When a shocking episode shatters her life shared by a boyfriend she loved and a girlfriend she was deeply attached to, she begins to collect objects that reminded her of happier times.  They offered a constancy that her friend and

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Historical Fiction

Florence Adler Swims Forever by Rachel Beanland

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve Florence, who is passionate about her swimming, plans to be one of the first women to swim the English Channel. She lives and trains in the ocean off Atlantic City and its famous Boardwalk.  She is vivacious and strong, loved by all who know her. Very early in the book, she

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Historical Fiction

Those Who Are Saved by Alexis Landau

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke Alexis Landau presents her story through the lives of three key characters between August 1940 and August 1945. They were all Jewish and each of them had different experiences during the time of the Nazi occupation in Europe. Chapter 1 is set in February 1945, then the story reverts to the

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ABIA Book Awards – 2021

AUSTRALIAN BOOK INDUSTRY AWARDS (ABIA) 2021 LONGLIST ANNOUNCEMENT IMPORTANT DATES AND INFORMATION  On Monday 22 February 2021 The Australian Publishers Association announced the 2021 ABIA longlist. The longlist introduces the titles, publishers and authors in the running for a coveted ABIA. This year, the Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIA) and the Sydney Writers’ Festival (SWF) have come

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General Fiction

The Shaman by Roland Perry

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Roland Perry has been a regular figure on both the fiction and non-fiction landscapes for many, many years. I remember reviewing his non-fiction book The Changi Brownlow when it came out in 2010. That book, like the present volume, was thoroughly researched and particularly well told. It was short-listed for the

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General Fiction

Dreams They Forgot by Emma Ashmere

Reviewed by Rod McLary Henry David Thoreau – in his series of essays Walden – said ‘the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation’.  Sometimes – and incorrectly – the words ‘and die with their song still inside them’ are added.  If ‘men’ is replaced with ‘women’, then this quote and its addendum is

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History

Bastard Behind The Lines by Tom Gilling

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Until I read Tom Gilling’s book, I had never heard of a soldier called Jock McLaren, a soldier who seems to have become a casualty of history. Only a very driven man could escape from two Japanese-held prisons during World War 2 and then carry the fight with guerrilla contingents after

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General Fiction

The Paris Affair by Pip Drysdale

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The Paris Affair is the third novel by Pip Drysdale. Her two earlier books The Sunday Girl and The Strangers We Know were both best sellers, sold worldwide with the second being developed for television. Her latest contribution, The Paris Affair, is a novel about modern society with much reference to

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Crime/Mystery

The Imitator by Rebecca Starford

Reviewed by Ian Lipke This is a page turner!  A gentle easing into a complex story, a story of friendship and betrayal, of power misused and innocence scuttled. The ideas on which the story builds are simple but are manipulated so well that the reader is immersed in mystery as dense as a London fog.

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If you would like to contact the coordinator of the Queensland Reviewers Collective, either to enquire about becoming a reviewer, to offer a book to review, or to make a comment on the blog generally, please use the form.

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