History

Queensland Reviewers Collective (QRC) is the new name for an initiative that began eighteen years ago. Up until November 2016 it was known as M/C Reviews. In December 2015, the M/C Reviews website had a major security breach that took it down, and the editor of the book reviews section and some of the reviewers responded by starting a blog as a temporary site for book reviews until the website could be repaired. Unfortunately, it eventually became apparent that the website was not able to be restored, thus ending its long and illustrious presence as a place for the lively engagement with books and film through reviewing.

Once again, the editor and a small group of book reviewers decided they valued M/C Reviews enough to enable its rebirth as the Queensland Reviewers Collective. It no longer has an association with the Queensland University of Technology.

The website that M/C Reviews was initially a part of was M/C – Media and Culture, founded in 1998 as, according to the History section, ‘a place of public intellectualism, analysing and critiquing the meeting of media and culture’. It was meant as a place where the popular and the academic could meet, and ‘debates may have some resonance with wider political and cultural interests’.

The website was initiated and developed at the University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; since 2004, it has been hosted by the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology in Kelvin Grove. The first publication was the M/C Journal, still thriving today, followed by M/C Reviews, and then M/Cyclopedia of New Media.

Acknowledgement of Country

In the spirit of reconciliation Queensland Reviewers Collective acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.

Other Reviews

Children

Mawson in Antarctica by Joanna Grochowicz

Reviewed by Antonella Townsend Best to wear a jumper and a beanie when reading Mawson in Antarctica, Joanna Grochowicz really takes you there.  At times during the narrative I did not want to be there – at all.  This is scary stuff of the non-fiction kind. Joanna Grochowicz has written a well-researched account of Douglas

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Author Events

Author Events For those readers who enjoy meeting and listening to their favourite authors, there are a number of Author Events coming during the next few months. Below is just a small sample of what is on offer. TUESDAY 9 JULY | INSTORE EVENT 6pm for a 6.30pm start | 60 mins Join us for

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General Fiction

The Ministry of Time by Kaliane Bradley

Reviewed by Antonella Townsend I have long since thought the publishing industry’s insistence that novels fall into a genre straight-jacket somewhat unnecessary, not to mention unimaginative.  Breaking through the mundane, Kaliane Bradley’s debut novel The Ministry of Time creates its own mixed-genre benchmark. Written in the first person, our narrator is a bi-racial, jaded, civil

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General Fiction

Heartsease by Kate Kruimink

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve It is impossible to resist the power of a book that is deeply perceptive in its unwaveringly honest scrutiny of family relations. The ties between two sisters, dealing with the death of a mother who was emotionally difficult and remote, is the focus of this exceptional novel. They come together at

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Children

How to Move a Zoo by Kate Simpson

Reviewed by Antonella Townsend I love true stories and I love elephants, so though the target demographic for Kate Simpson’s How to Move a Zoo is for children four to eight years, this large hard cover book  will remain on my coffee table for all my adult friends to appreciate a slice of Sydney history. 

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Non-Fiction

Everything is Water by Simon Cleary

Reviewed by Norrie Sanders River journeys are a familiar genre.   Whether it be the mighty Nile, Amazon or Congo, or the less mighty Thames or Murray, historians, geographers, anthropologists and hikers, to name a few, have felt the need to explore and write about it. Closer to home, our more modest Brisbane River has been

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International Booker Prize

International Booker Prize 2024 The novel Kairos, written by Jenny Erpenbeck and translated from German by Michael Hofmann (Granta), has won the £50,000 (A$95,325) International Booker Prize. Kairos was chosen from a shortlist of six by a judging panel that included writer and broadcaster Eleanor Wachtel (chair), poet Natalie Diaz, Booker Prize–shortlisted novelist Romesh Gunesekera, artist William Kentridge, and writer,

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Historical Fiction

The Librarians of Rue de Picardie by Janet Skeslien Charles

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke Less than 40 miles from the front line of fighting, during the first World War, a group of three hundred and fifty women from the US, Canada and Great Britain worked to rebuild northern France from 1917 to 1924. This novel, The Librarians of Rue de Picardie, by Janet Skeslien Charles

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Non-Fiction

Why We Die by Venki Ramakrishnan

Reviewed by E. B. Heath Ageing and death are currently hot topics in the publishing world.  No doubt influenced by a wave of Baby Boomers now facing the inevitable.  But they are not the only group chasing immortality.  There are many in affluent countries who are opting for their bodies to be preserved using the

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If you would like to contact the coordinator of the Queensland Reviewers Collective, either to enquire about becoming a reviewer, to offer a book to review, or to make a comment on the blog generally, please use the form.

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