October 2016

The Unexpected Professor: An Oxford Life in Books by John Carey

Reviewed by Sue Bond This book was hugely enjoyable for a book nut like myself. I do not expect everyone will relate to John Carey’s opinions or life history but if the life of the mind interests you and books and literature are an important part of your life, you too may find this worth

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In the Kitchen: 120 Favourite Recipes for Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Picnics and Parties by Simmone Logue

  Reviewed by Jill Simmone Logue’s fine food company focusses on seasonal produce and beautiful presentation.  Her latest venture is In the Kitchen: 120 favourite recipes for breakfasts, lunches, dinners, picnics and parties.  It is a personal tour of Logue’s food landscape.  The sights along the way are fabulous.  There are no calorie counts, so

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The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Without the slightest shadow of a doubt this book, for me and I am sure all of the rom-com community, is the book of the year. Lucy Hutton likes to be thought of as helpful, and is considered so, by everyone except Joshua Templeman. Unfortunately for them both, they are stuck

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Apprentice in Death by J D Robb

Reviewed by Ian Lipke J. D. Robb’s latest ‘in Death’ novel reads as fresh as though it were her first. Certainly it feels nothing like the forty-something adventure that has been published in this series. The plot is not much different, perhaps more tortuous than most. The characters are well-defined and rounded, depending on the

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Obsession in Death by J D Robb

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Would you like to read a book that will not let you budge from your comfortable lounge, that has you checking that your door is locked and bolted, that fires your brain to determine who the monster is who kills for the most bizarre of reasons that on the surface look

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The Anglo-Saxon World by N J Higham and Martin J Ryan

Reviewed by Dr Kay Smith The Anglo-Saxon World is an attractive book at first sight, with a handsome cover and page edges in even stripes of white and cream. The paper is semi-gloss and there are coloured illustrations on almost every page. It is weighty to handle but the content easy to read and full

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For Once in My Life by Marianne Kavanagh

Reviewed by Carole Castle For Once in My Life is London writer Marianne Kavanagh’s debut novel. The cover is enticing and symbolic: a little black dress, piano keys and large splashes of colour. Tess believes everyone in the world has a soul mate – they are two halves of a whole. They just have to

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A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale

Reviewed by Sue Green From an aimless but ordered life in Edwardian England, with a wife and young daughter, Harry Crane moves alone to the wild and untamed Canadian prairies. Winter becomes his home, his sanctuary and ultimate escape from a life of potential misery. A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale is a novel

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