April 2017

At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present by Maria Dibattista and Deborah Epstein Nord

    Reviewed by Dr Kathleen Huxley As the title of this book implies this oeuvre “offers an account of the female literary tradition of the last two centuries that recognizes and evaluates its engagement with public life”. Throughout the book there is an emergence of recurrent themes that uncover the evident, but often underestimated,

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Kumakana A Gronups Tale by Kevin Price

    Reviewed by E.B. Heath ‘Her mother had told her how the trees shaped the forest – the karri, among the world’s tallest, and the tingle, with its massive girth, one of the largest.  She told her that their bark hid spiders with sixty-five million years of history.   ‘There are secrets and legends far

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Hippy Days, Arabian Nights – a Memoir by Katherine Boland

    Reviewed by Ian Lipke I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life – and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do – Georgia O’Keeffe Katherine Boland shares Georgia O’Keeffe’s quote with her readers and it is transparently obvious why she does so. Hippy Days,

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Accidentally on Purpose by Jill Shalvis

Reviewed by bonne nuit This light-hearted story entrances the reader as she is taken inside the intimate day to day occurrences that occur with marked regularity around Elle Wheaton. Elle is a girl who is most interested in the important things in a girl’s life – shoes, for instance, or friends, or even a career.

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Beyond the Wild River by Sarah Maine

Reviewed by Ian Lipke When mankind accepts evil, the good tread with great care that they are not themselves ensnared. Charles Ballantyre almost delayed too long. His daughter’s happiness and the life of a good man hung in the balance. In Scotland 1893 a poacher is shot and killed on the estate of a wealthy

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The Greatest – The Quest for Sporting Perfection by Matthew Syed

Reviewed by Mike Clarke   If anybody could be described as a living encyclopaedia of sport it would be Matthew Syed. A columnist and feature writer for The Times, he has twice won ‘Sports Journalist of the Year’ at The British Press Awards. He is a regular contributor to BBC programmes and a sportsman in

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The Girl Who Was Taken by Charlie Donlea

Reviewed by Ian Lipke “Let ‘em drool!” A short sharp rejoinder from a brittle character who plays a large part in Charlie Donlea’s The Girl Who Was Taken. Nicole Cutty, amoral, tough and brash has no concern about nude breasts when young men hover. When she and other high school senior girls disappear from the

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Fragments by Antigone Kefala

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Antigone Kefala is a contemporary Australian poet and prose-writer of Rumanian heritage. Her family moved to Greece but settled in New Zealand after World War II. Having studied French literature at Victoria University Antigone Kefala relocated to Australia in 1960. She has taught English as a second language and worked as a university and

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Word Migrants by Hazel Smith

Reviewed by Ian Lipke   Sustained beyond reverberation; resonant beyond deafness (from The Disappeared) is an apt appellation to Hazel Smith’s active conscience. She has never been known to dodge the odd bit of controversy and her latest collection of poems follows a well-worn path. If there is one word readers might use to describe

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Fatal Crossing by Lone Theils

Reviewed by Ian Lipke He gave a light shrug. “Why not? It’s what they deserved. They were nothing but cockroaches. All we did was clean out the kitchen.”  In such a manner does Lone Theils introduce her readers to a Rwandan mass murderer and through him to Nora Sand, an investigative journalist with the Danish

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