June 2017

Dear Banjo by Sasha Wasley

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke Dear Banjo is a love story set in the cattle country of Western Australia. But it is not just a boy meets girl – something goes wrong – they hate each other –and after several ups and downs they end up together. This is a story filled with human emotion. Willow

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Come Sundown by Nora Roberts

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Nora Roberts always produces a fine story with a neat balance between romance and suspense. Come Sundown  belongs to the same stable but is more exploratory of the darkness of the mind of a psychopath. There is fun and laughter and love and mystery as one has come to expect, but

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The Essential Paradise Lost by John Carey

  Reviewed by Ian Lipke It is tempting to damn a writer who dares to publish just the interesting bits of any classic piece of literature. One would have thought that Paradise Lost is a work beyond the savagery of the vandal’s pen, to gut Milton’s great work seems sacrilegious, something that is just not

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The Mouth that Roared by Les Twentyman with Robert Hillman

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Les Twentyman and Robert Hillman, separately leaders in their respective fields, together have produced one of the great biographies of the twenty-first century. This is Les Twentyman’s own story – the unassuming hero of the down-and-outs whose lives are suddenly changed by the interjection of a down-to-earth personality into their weary

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ADMISSIONS: a life in brain surgery by Henry Marsh

Reviewed by Dr Kathleen Huxley   As a follow on from his successful book Do No Harm Henry Marsh, the author of ADMISSIONS: a life in brain surgery weaves his wealth of experiences and roles as a doctor, neurosurgeon and colleague as well as son, husband and father into a series of fascinating snapshots into

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A Crime in the Family by Sacha Batthyany

  Reviewed by Norrie Sanders “It was the massacre of 180 Jews that brought me closer to my family” The last few days of the Second World War were congested with events that have become synonymous with human suffering and destruction. Gratuitous violence by retreating German troops, Adolf Hitler’s suicide, liberation of death camps and

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Mr Rochester by Sarah Shoemaker

  Reviewed by Ian Lipke In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre we meet Edward Fairfax Rochester one January afternoon when his horse slips on ice and its rider is thrown. Rescued by the governess Jane Eyre, he becomes known for his brooding, taciturn manner while the story unfolds. In Mr Rochester, Sarah Shoemaker has given us

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