August 2017

Wimmera by Mark Brandi

  Reviewed by Angela Marie As he got closer to the middle of the river, Jed thought he could see bolts screwed into the top of the bin ….It looked like somebody wanted it closed up really tight ….Like they didn’t want what was in there to ever come out. So commences the intertwining of

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Now Let’s Dance by Karine Lambert

Reviewed by Antonella Townsend I love a fairy tale retold and I’m thinking the French translation of Karine Lambert’s Now Let’s Dance would be Sleeping Beauty.   Only our sleeping heroine aged a bit while comatose, which is just fine because the handsome prince is no spring chicken. A dual narrative of alternate chapters introduces us

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Bush Doctors by Annabelle Brayley

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The author, Annabelle Brayley, is a trained nurse who has lived on an isolated sheep and cattle station in South West Queensland. Because of this she has firsthand knowledge of the hardship and isolation experienced by people in the outback and the medical teams who elect to minister to these people.

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No Way! Okay, Fine by Brodie Lancaster

Reviewed by Clare W. Brook I’m feeling almost in touch with all that is modern having just read No Way!  Okay, Fine by Brodie Lancaster. Brodie is a dedicated young professional film, television, and modern music commentator, writing for publications such as Rookie, Pitchfork, Junkee, Film Fatales and Rolling Stone.  Her debut book, No Way! 

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Codename Villanelle by Luke Jennings

Reviewed by Ian Lipke It is no secret that Luke Jennings has taken four stories from Kindle and turned them into a novel. But what sort of novel and how successful has he been? Let me answer the second question. He has been an outstanding success. Jennings has created a secret agent with a history

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Her by Garry Disher

Reviewed by Rod McLary The author has set Her in western Victoria in the early twentieth century and the novel spans some ten years in the life of the eponymous character Her.  She has no other name except that which she gives herself after a customer refers to ‘pretty garland lillies’ in her hearing.  She

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No More Boats by Felicity Castagna

Reviewed by Gretchen Winters I enjoyed reading Felicity Castagna’s latest novel.  Felicity won the 2015 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Young Adult Fiction for her previous novel, The Incredible Here and Now, that was also adapted for the stage by the National Theatre of Parramatta. Felicity’s work has appeared on radio and television and she

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Battle Scars by Charlene Ericson

Reviewed by E.B. Heath I have just read the second edition of Battle Scars and am basking in the reflected courage of a determined, gutsy woman, while at the same time not being at all confident that I could match Charlene Ericson’s herculean task in over-coming stage 3C ovarian cancer. It would be a good

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The Last Man in Europe by Dennis Glover

Reviewed by Clare W Brook The Last Man in Europe by Dennis Glover is a novel about writing a novel, the personal history of its author and the era in which he lived.  The work of fiction in question is one of the most important books written in the twentieth century, and remains vital reading

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The Country Wedding by Barbara Hannay

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The Country Wedding is the latest book for Australian romance writer Barbara Hannay. This novelist has written more than forty novels which have been translated into twenty-six languages worldwide. The Country Wedding is actually two love stories and is set in the tropical Atherton Tableland. It is a story about love

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The Late Show by Michael Connelly

Reviewed by Ian Lipke When you read a Michael Connelly novel, you feel as though you’re right in the middle of the action in the Los Angeles Police Department. I wouldn’t know what life in the LAPD is like, having read Connelly, I have no wish to know. I’ll observe all the politicking and the

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Liberty or Death – the French Revolution by Peter McPhee

Reviewed by Ian Lipke The French Revolution was never ‘over’. Its achievements and triumphs – like its deceptions and atrocities – were of a scale that made its stature unique. Its reverberations were felt across the globe after 1789 and they live with us still. The aim of the French revolutionaries is given boldly in

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The Art of Time Travel by Tom Griffiths

Reviewed by E.B. Heath The past is never dead. It’s not even past. William Faulkner Tom Griffiths’ new book The Art of Time Travel, has been a revelation!  I understood history as static, a dry, dates-and-dead- people package, but I now find myself in the grip of an enthusiasm experienced by the newly converted.  This engaging

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