October 2017

The Commando by Ben McKelvey

Reviewed by Ian Lipke To undertake a review of this book is one of the more difficult tasks I have set for myself. It’s not because Cameron Baird VC, MG does not deserve the accolades that the media (including this book) have awarded him. He was without doubt the warrior we all depended on to

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The Influential Mind by Tali Sharot

Reviewed by Norrie Sanders Tali Sharot has distilled research from the last four decades to explain how we are persuaded. She analyses this from many angles – the effects of fear, risk avoidance, our desire for control and the value of information – to name a few.  The book is eminently readable, even by those

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Milton and the Making of Paradise Lost by William Poole

Reviewed by Ian Lipke William Poole’s publication is a testament to interesting academic scholarship. He defies the mantra that scholarly publications must, by their very nature, be arid publications. His style is pitched to an academic audience but is comprehensible without much effort by a group of undergraduates. The subtlety of the English language is

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A Question of Trust by Penny Vincenzi

Reviewed by Antonella Townsend So, at last, you can judge a book by its cover!   I was expecting glitz and glamour and oodles of dramatic romance, and A Question of Trust did not let me down!  This is, definitely, a champagne and strawberries novel. The lovely, totally spoilt, Diana Southcott and her best friend, Wendelien,

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Outback Legends by Evan McHugh

Reviewed by Gretchen Winters Ewan McHugh is a journalist who has written for Australian newspapers, television and radio.  His previous books include The Stockmen: the Making of an Australian Dream as well as other untold stories of Australians as diverse as bushrangers and outback pioneers. His latest book Outback Legends, contains remarkable biographies of the

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Every Word is a Bird We Teach to Sing by Daniel Tammet

  Reviewed by E. B. Heath Nature is a book written in the language of mathematics Galileo Galilei There are some extraordinary people walking this earth. Daniel Tammet is one whose ability raises questions about the brain, the extent of its capacity, and even human consciousness.   Daniel Tammet has been classified as a high functioning

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The Little Breton Bistro by Nina George

Reviewed by Angela Marie Readers and lovers of Nina George’s “The Little Paris Bookshop” should not be disappointed by her latest novel, “The Little Breton Bistro”, a heartfelt and intriguing journey. It was the first decision she had ever made on her own, the very first time she was able to determine the course of her life. Marianne

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Sanctuary by Judy Nunn

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke With Sanctuary Judy Nunn has written an Australian novel which clearly highlights important issues of the time. Set in her home State of Western Australia this novel reveals the human side of the illegal immigrant issue. A motley group of nine people had been set adrift after a storm had smashed

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Cold War Games by Harry Blutstein

Reviewed by Norrie Sanders The Melbourne Olympic Games, 1956. Australia is finally on the map. These will be, they suggested, the “friendly” games. The portents were not great. In the month before the games opened, Russia invaded Hungary and soon after, Egypt was invaded by Israel, Britain and France. Other countries protested by boycotting the

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