December 2017

Stealth Raiders: A Few Daring Men in 1918 by Lucas Jordan

Reviewed by Rod McLary The sub-title of this book immediately provides two clues to its subject.  The year is the last year of World War I and ‘daring men’ suggests courage and risk-taking.  This book offers a radical reappraisal of the Australian infantrymen and challenges the ‘historical neglect’ they have experienced since the great War

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Simplissime Light – The Easiest Cookbook in the World by Jean Francois Mallet

Reviewed by Amy Welsh The title of Jean-François Mallet’s wonderful new cookbook, Simplissime Light – The Easiest Cookbook in the World, does not lie; it is perhaps the clearest, most user-friendly, cookbook currently available. The graphic layout of Simplissime Light makes every aspect of the contents abundantly clear at a glance.  Each recipe is clearly

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The Husband Hunters: Social Climbing in London and New York by Anne de Courcy

Reviewed by Dr Kathleen Huxley Anne de Courcy is a best-selling writer, journalist and book reviewer who has received critical acclaim for her works depicting the rich social history of past eras. Her well-received, serialised for TV, biographies discuss the impact of prevailing financial and social conditions, contemporary attitudes and moral codes on her subjects’

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Whipbird by Robert Drewe

Reviewed by Clare Brook In his latest novel, Whipbird, Robert Drewe has created a satirical portrait of Australia through the lives and circumstances of the Cleary Clan.  The Clearys are gathered at Hugh Cleary’s vineyard outside Ballarat, to celebrate the 160th anniversary of Conor Cleary’s arrival, from Ireland, to the shores of Australia in 1854.

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The Classic Yoga Bible by Christina Brown

Reviewed by Clare Brook Yoga is learning to come back to yourself. It’s finding your limits, expanding your boundaries and being able to truly relax into who you are. The introduction to The Classic Yoga Bible, by Christina Brown, gives an explanation of yoga, and its intended benefits.   Often, yoga is misrepresented as only a set of

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Everless by Sara Holland

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Nice one, Sarah Holland. A fantasy novel aimed at younger teenagers with enough deadly intent, magic, and romance to suit both girls and boys. The story is open-ended, allowing for at least one more volume. Minnesota born and bred, Sara Holland grew up in a small town where reading was a

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Void: the Strange Physics of Nothing by James Owen Weatherall

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Jim Weatherall has taken possibly the most arid word in use on the planet and written a book that is scientifically precise, rich in history and cultural endeavour, and at all times, engaging. That word is nothing. Take all your molecules, atoms, electrons, quarks and gluons – such old hat science

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The Secret Life by Andrew O'Hagan

Reviewed by Rod McLary The epigraph to The Secret Life is from a poem by Paul Éluard, a French surrealist poet of the 20th century: ‘There is another world, but it is in this one’.  This brief quote captures the essence of Andrew O’Hagan’s three essays in The Secret Life in which he explores ‘the

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Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living by Krista Tippett

Reviewed by Gretchen Winters Krista Tippett’s latest book is a wonderful testimony to her views on religion and personal growth. Tippett is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and New York Times best- selling author.  In 2014, she received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House for “thoughtfully delving into the mysteries of

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Close to the Flame by Richard Davis

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Ask an Australian to identify the most famous Australian classical music conductor since 1788 and I’ll be astounded if anyone can do so. Drop the hint that he came from a farm in Tasmania and that he died offering support for AIDS sufferers like himself…prepare to agree that Australians in general

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