November 2022

Australian Political Book of the Year – 2022

  Dean Ashenden has won the inaugural $10,000 Australian Political Book of the Year Award for Telling Tennant’s Story: The strange career of the great Australian Silence, published by Black Inc. Ashenden’s book was chosen by judges Laurie Oakes, Laura Tingle and John Warhurst from a shortlist of four announced in October, which also included Bob Hawke: Demons and

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Non-Fiction

Daughters of Durga by Manjula Datta O’Connor

Reviewed by Margaret Elizabeth Today, right now, you could be living or working next to a woman suffering from domestic violence. A woman who needs your help. Daughters of Durga: Dowries, Gender Violence and Family in Australia (2022) exposes the causation of dowry-based violence perpetrated against women from Southeast Asia. Women living in Australia. Professor

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Memoir/Biography

The Wonder of Little Things by Vince Copley

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The Wonder of Little Things is the life story of Ngadjuri Elder, Vince Copley, who in his 85 years helped make life a little better for First Nations people. At the urging of his wife, Brenda, he embarked on this writing with the help of Irish-Australian Lea McInerney who also grew

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Fantasy/Science Fiction

Poster Girl by Veronica Roth

Reviewed by Margaret Elizabeth ‘Right is Right’ proclaims the political slogan of the Delegation, forever associated with the image of sixteen-year-old Sonya Kantor. Suddenly, a revolution turns fame to infamy and Sonya is imprisoned in the Aperture for life, transformed from feted Poster Girl to the living symbol of the evils of the old regime.

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Memoir/Biography

Tim Faulkner’s Aussie Ark by Tim Faulkner

Reviewed by Norrie Sanders Tim Faulkner is one of those blokes in the green gear who mesmerises kids with his stories about Australian wildlife, while demonstrating how to milk a venomous snake or grab an enraged croc.  He channels decades of similar characters – from Harry Butler to Steve Irwin and Ranger Stacey – who

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An Interview with Chris Hammer – author of The Tilt

QRC was fortunate to be able to interview Chris Hammer about his new book The Tilt which features Aaron Falk.  Please see the interview below. There is a strong sense of family in the novel whether we are looking at Nell’s relationship with her parents, or the Buchanan family, or James Waters and his family. Is the

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History

We, The Oppressors by Dr Jack Davy

Reviewed by Richard Tutin Oppression is rife in the world. It always has been and probably always will be. History indicates that there has never been a moment when oppression has been totally eradicated. If that is the case, then oppressive actions and desires need to be managed. However, oppression has an equally insidious companion

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Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2022

The shortlists for the 2022 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards have been announced. The shortlisted works in each category, chosen from 545 entries, are: Fiction Dark as Last Night (Tony Birch, UQP) The Hands of Pianists (Stephen Downes, Fomite) Devotion (Hanna Kent, Picador) Night Blue (Angela O’Keeffe, Transit Lounge) Red Heaven (Nicolas Rothwell, Text). ‘Being recognised through these prestigious awards

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Voss Literary Prize 2022

The shortlist for the Voss Literary Prize has been announced. The shortlisted works, chosen from a longlist of 10, are: The Other Half of You (Michael Mohammed Ahmad, Hachette) * After Story (Larissa Behrendt, UQP) Scary Monsters (Michelle De Kretser, A&U) Bodies of Light (Jennifer Down, Text) From Where I Fell (Susan Johnson, A&U) One Hundred Days (Alice Pung, Black Inc.).

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Memoir/Biography

Banjo Paterson by Alistair Campbell

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke This 29×26 cm hard covered book with dust jacket is a life in pictures and words from the Banjo Paterson Family Archive. All types of personal memorabilia have been brought together for the first time by Banjo’s great-grandson, and sole executor of the poet’s literary estate, Alistair Campbell, with intimate commentary

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Literature

A Guest at the Feast by Colm Tóibín

Reviewed by Ian Lipke A book of essays by Colm Tóibín is a perfect reason for excitement. His latest, A Guest at the Feast, provides warm support to the reputation this international writer enjoys. Colm Tóibín was born in Ireland in 1955. He is the author of Nora Webster, and seven other novels, including The Blackwater Lightship, The

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General Fiction

The Last Chairlift by John Irving

Reviewed by Ian Lipke When Adam Brewster, the protagonist of John Irving’s new novel, The Last Chairlift finds himself enmeshed in an incestuous affair with his unmarried mother, all the signs flash “Beware! This book may not be worth the time needed to read it.” The fleshpots are further indicated by the naming of the

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Crime/Mystery

The Rising Tide by Ann Cleeves

Reviewed by Gerard Healy This is a cracking crime novel from Ann Cleeves featuring her sharp but down-to-earth Inspector Vera Stanhope. It is the tenth Vera novel that Cleeves has written. This story involves a group of friends, who bonded over a weekend retreat on an island, near the end of their secondary school days.

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General Fiction

Runt by Craig Silvey

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke This was one of the most interesting, humorous and satisfying books that I have read for some time. Written by Western Australian Craig Silvey, and illustrated with sketches by Sara Acton, this book with its hard cover and dust jacket reminded me of the Readers Digest books. One of this author’s

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Crime/Mystery

East of Alice by Annie Seaton

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The author of this novel, Annie Seaton, is a prolific writer having produced well over fifty books in ten years. She has been classed as a hybrid author, with a foot in different publishing areas. She has also written over several genres from contemporary historic romance to eco-adventure fiction set in

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