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When She Was Good by Michael Robotham

Reviewed by Gerard Healy An engaging crime thriller from Michael Robotham featuring his clinical psychologist Cyrus Haven and a teenage survivor Evie. These two become emmeshed in a complex web of deceit, blackmail and murder involving some powerful figures with very guilty consciences. It is set mainly in northern England in 2020, but without any

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The Half Sister by Sandie Jones

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke The Half Sister is the third novel by freelance journalist, Sandie Jones, who has contributed to the Sunday Times, Daily Mail, Woman’s Weekly and Hello magazine, amongst others. Discovering that her debut novel, The Other Woman, was a New York Times Bestseller in 2018, which sold in fourteen other languages, I looked forward to reading her 2020

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Bush School by Peter O’Brien

Reviewed by Rod McLary Nearly all of us were once students at primary school; and we all were taught by teachers – some good, some not so good and a few excellent ones who took us beyond the basic syllabus.  It is these latter teachers we tend to remember.  This is a neat segue to

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The Mystery of Charles Dickens by A.N. Wilson

Reviewed by Rod McLary Charles Dickens was one of the most loved authors of the Victorian era.  He created some of the best-known and best-loved characters in English literature and is regarded by some as the greatest author of the Victorian era.  Books by Dickens – such as Great Expectations, David Copperfield and A Christmas

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The Hunted by Gabriel Bergmoser

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Somebody once described this debut book as a Rottweiler of a novel. How very true! Bergmoser is unputdownable. I read the book at a single sitting as I could not bear the suspense. I wanted to help the put-upon find resolution of their difficulties. Like the attack dog, he never lets

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The Order by Daniel Silva

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Daniel Silva is a veteran of the paperback empire. He boasts a long history of imagining, writing and publishing books in a variety of genres with the sole purpose of providing entertainment. His publisher lists twenty-two volumes, his latest The Order being No 23. Material written around Silva asserts and confirms

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A Dance with Fate by Juliet Marillier

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Juliet Marillier is a veteran fantasy story-teller. I’ve not come across her books before now, but she boasts an impressive line-up under the Pan Macmillan label, and while I know nothing about her other books, I can say that A Dance with Fate, second volume of the Warrior Bards series, is

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Wild by Kristin Hannah

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Wild is a remarkable novel. It is a representation of the human spirit in both its praiseworthy and ugly forms. It is, on the surface, the story of a woman, her reputation slaughtered by the ugliness of less qualified colleagues and clamorous public opinion, who undertakes a project and, in the

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Budgets Don’t Work [But This Does] by Melissa Browne

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke Melissa Browne is an author, financial educator, accountant, speaker and entrepreneur and in 2016 she was named one of the Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence and therefore is suitably qualified to write a book on this topic. She believes that for most of us, a ‘homogeneous, one-size-fits-all financial approach just

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Playing Nice by JP Delaney

Reviewed by Rod McLary Stories of babies switched at birth have been part of fictional literature since at least the eighteenth century.  The plot device has been used by writers as different from each other as Gilbert and Sullivan [The Gondoliers] and Mark Twain [The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson]; and more recently in various films

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