Non-Fiction

Non-Fiction

Vegetarian Meals in 30 Minutes by Anita Bean

Reviewed by Clare Brook Anita Bean studied for a degree in Nutrition and Food Science at the University of Surrey, England.  She is the author of twenty-eight books on nutrition and fitness including the best-selling The Complete Guide to Sports Nutrition, first published in 1993, currently in its eighth edition.  Bean’s publishing success can be attributed

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Non-Fiction

A Little History of Poetry by John Carey

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve All those who delight in the beauty of language, expressed in its most refined form, poetry, will embrace this history. John Carey is an eminent academic, currently Emeritus Professor at Oxford. He has written several books. It is an indicator of his standing in the field of literature when his stature

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Non-Fiction

We Can’t Say We Didn’t Know by Sophie McNeill

Reviewed by Norrie Sanders Sophie McNeill has assembled diverse stories from the Middle East, linked by her involvement as an ABC journalist and humanitarian. Refugees, war and authoritarian regimes are prominent. These are delivered to us in a way that brief television reports could not. They follow individuals or families and their ability to survive,

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Memoir/Biography

The Lost Boy by Ayik Chut Deng [with Craig Henderson]

Reviewed by Ian Lipke From Vintage Books, an arm of Penguin Random House Australia, comes the story of a Sudanese man Ayik Chut Deng, a former child soldier, who found his way to Australia and settled in Toowoomba, Queensland. Bearing resemblances to Songs of a War Boy by Deng Thiak Adut (Hachette Australia, 2016), that

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Non-Fiction

Budgerigar by Sarah Harris and Don Baker

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve Loved by the Queen, Winston Churchill and millions of others, and key to Richard Branson’s first money making venture, the little Australian native bird’s story is a tapestry of historical and social detail as well as a celebration of the value of the budgerigar as a pet. Highly entertaining, unexpectedly full

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Non-Fiction

The Ghost and the Bounty Hunter by Adam Courtenay

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve Early colonial history is rich in stories that are as varied as they are fascinating. The people from the 18th/19th century, who arrived from Britain to begin their lives anew in this foreign land, provide countless stories of what it took to survive. Many left the poverty of Industrial England but

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Non-Fiction

Phosphorescence by Julia Baird

Reviewed by Ian Lipke I’m not sure if I can review this book. I find myself soaking up the words on the pages, reading and re-reading and thinking – about the ideas, the emotions Julia Baird’s words evoke, about the woman herself. In ‘Lessons from a Cuttlefish’ the author writes about awe. That is what

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Non-Fiction

Rust by Eliese Colette Goldbach

Reviewed by Rod McLary The title of this book, part memoir and part social commentary, references the colloquial name ‘Rust Belt’ which was given to the north-eastern states in America where a major decline in the steel industry occurred from the 1980s.  The Rust Belt was so-called because of the consequent economic and social decline

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Non-Fiction

A Dog Called Harry by Jill Baker

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve After reading the promotion to the publication of this book, I supposed that Harry had to be a very exceptional dog. Jill Baker, the author and devoted owner of Harry, suffered within a year, the death of her beloved husband, George, and a diagnosis and subsequent treatment for breast cancer. For

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Non-Fiction

Truganini by Cassandra Pybus

Reviewed by Ian Lipke Professor Henry Reynolds has described Cassandra Pybus’s Truganini as “a book of unquestionable national importance.” I could not agree more. It is a compelling book for Australians, for its stance on the human rights that aborigines would have expected, but were denied as a consequence of the blatant self-aggrandisement of George

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Non-Fiction

She I Dare Not Name by Donna Ward

Reviewed by Patricia Simms-Reeve The title gives pause. Spinster is a word that may appear in novels of past centuries, but is rarely used today. It carries an aura of sadness and loneliness, even failure. Failure to be married, to bear children. Sections of this book are deeply affecting and do convey powerful feelings of

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Non-Fiction

The Girls by Chloe Higgins

Reviewed by Wendy Lipke Some people believe that it is important for children to have pets as they get the opportunity to experience death and learn about the grieving process and that this will prepare them for the experience of losing a family member. Others believe that the grieving process is somehow innate in us

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